My Favouite Walks

Ben Aigan and Knockmore Circuit

This fantastic hike not only takes along a walk in the woods you will also experience some amazing views right out to the coast and the River Spey. Passing by the Knockmore tv mast before coming to the summit of Ben Aigan with 360 degree views of Moray.

Distance: 7 1/2 miles Time: 3 1/2-4hrs Level: Easy long walk with elevation. Terrain: Forrest track and paths some can be uneven Access: Arrive by car, from Keith at Mulben cross road take a and head towards Craigellachie about 1 1/4miles along the road there is a opening on the right. Turn into the opening and head up the track ignore the turn to the right. After a short time you will come to a carpark for about 6 cars at the left.

Route: Leaving the car park head to the forestry road to the left after about 3/4 a miles the road bends to the left and you will head further into the woods. The road will climb steadily. Don’t forget to look back and admire the views.

The Knockmore mast will come into view on your left before finally reaching it around 2 miles in to your walk.

Once you are past the mast carry on along the forestry track you will go down hill for a short time before it starts to climb again. You will come to a large cleared area and shortly after there is a track to the left ignore it and keep on the track.

About 3/4 mile along this section you will find a fantastic view of the River Spey and if you look hard enough you will see the Boat a Brig.

Shortly after there is a junction with a narrow path to the uphill to the left and downhill to the right. Take the path to the left. This is a short but steep section but you will soon come out the trees as you head to the summit.

You will come to a fork, take the fork to the right which will take you right up to the summit where you will find the square trig point.

After you have enjoyed the views head back down the path you came. When you come to the junction take the turn to the right. You will come to another junction take the track to the left here.

Head down the track and you will return to the cleared area. You will see a firebreak in the trees to the right. Head down the path in the firebreak. You will need to climb over a fallen tree. At the bottom of the track turn to the right and return to the carpark.

My Favouite Walks

Linn Falls Circular, Aberlour, Moray

This circular route is based around Aberlour in the heart of Speyside, an area famed for its whisky distilleries and shortbread factory. The walk takes you out of the town and into the woods. Following the woodland path, you will come to the stunning Linn Falls (Linn of Ruthrie waterfalls). On your return to the town you will pass by the Aberlour Distillery before finding the hidden packhorse bridge.

Start: The Square Aberlour Distance: 2 miles Time: 1 hour Terrain: Sections of pavements and road, along with a section of forest path and track. Some steps and rough ground. Access: Arrive by car or public transport. Stagecoach No 36 bus runs between Elgin and Aberlour at regular intervals throughout the day. Car parking available at Alice Littler Memorial park (postcode AB38 9QP). The walk starts from The Square (postcode AB38 9PX).

Route: Starting from The Square, pass the Co-op on your left-hand side and head up Queen’s Road. Once past the Fleming Hospital on your right, you will see a sign for Glenallachie and Fairy Knowe. Follow the narrow path up on to the road turning right. Just past the street of houses, take the narrower road to the back of sheds. It is signposted to the falls.

At the end of the tarred , narrow road, you will come to a gate, pass through the gate and on to a woodland path.

Stay on the main path, ignoring any paths that branch off. The main path will curve to the right, and you will descend steps with a handrail and soon see the beautiful double-cascading waterfall.

Make sure you take plenty of photographs.

You can stop for a picnic here and perhaps even a paddle.

Once you have explored the falls, Follow the Burn of Aberlour round to the right and after a short walk you will pass the Aberlour Distillery on your left. This is another great photo opportunity.

When you arrive at the bridge at the main road cross over. Be careful of traffic as this road can be busy. Once safely across, look over the bridge and nestled in the undergrowth there is a small, old packhorse bridge that was built around 1624.

Take the path to the right-hand side of the packhorse bridge which will lead you back to the car park if you parked at the Alice Littler Memorial Park. Or take a right to take you along the High Street and back to The Square.

My Favouite Walks

Meikle Balloch Hill Circuit, Near Keith

The Meikle Balloch Hill overlooks Keith and on a clear day you can see the hill path from my house in Keith. It is a beautiful and peaceful walk through the forest and among the heather, the views of Moray and Aberdeenshire are incredible.

Start: Balloch forestry car park near Keith Distance: 4 miles Time: Allow one and a half to two hours Terrain: Mainly forestry roads. Downhill section is uneven in parts Access: Arrive by car. To reach the car park , turn up Bridge street from Keith and follow the road until you come to a parking area after approx two miles. The postcode is AB55 5NT

Route: At the car park you will see a information board. To the right of the board there is a blue-marked post at the start of the a narrow path into the trees. Follow this path for about 200 yards. You come to a forestry road, take a right here and then keep on this road. There are some nice views of the countryside through the trees as you pass along this section. After about three-quarters of a mile, there is a fork to the right; ignore this and continue on. The road does gently climb here but nothing too taxing.

You will pass a Scottish Water reservoir and the Balloch Quarry. Not long after passing the quarry there is a signpost for Coachford; ignore this if you wish to proceed directly on the planned route. But, for those with the time time and inclination, it is well worth a brief detour. About 20 yards along the Coachford turn off, there is a small pond to the left where dragonflies can be spotted in the summer.

Back on the main track, about 80 yards further on from the Coachford signpost, there is a turn to the left. Take this road and head further up the hill where it will begin to get steeper. Keep on this road. There are plenty of great views on the way up where the trees have been felled. Less than a mile along the stretch, the road will narrow as you come out the trees and reach a fork with two paths. Take the path to the right. This will take you up to the summit and trig point where 360-degree views of Moray and Aberdeenshire await.

After enjoying the views, it is time to descend. Take the path to the right. Once you are back in the woods the path will zigzag before coming to a straight downhill section that can be quite uneven. You will reach a crossroads, take a left here and this will bring you back to the forestry road. After a short stretch, you will come to the last fork in the road. Take a right which will take you back to the gate at the car park.

Walking essentials

Who knew there was a sock manufacturer in Moray?

When you do lots of walking there is 2 vital pieces of equipment you need. Good boots and comfy socks. The perfect pair of both will enable you to walk further and longer.

Last week Heather at Scottish Womans walking group posted some monogramed SWWG merino wool socks that were made in North East Scotland. So I was very interested to find out where. After a wee search I found Caledonia Hosiery on social media.

After wee chat online with the owner Steve he invited me along to his socks factory. I jumped at the chance. The inner geek came out as I am very interested in how things are made.

The company is situated in Forres Moray. It was started in October 2019 and started producing in April 2020. The owner Steve has actually spent half his working life making socks and is very passionate about it. This has now rubbed off on his wife Sue too.

Onsite the couple are producing 1000 pairs of socks a week each pair of socks taking around 8 mins to make. They produce various styles made from wool and cotton. They are all hand finished onsite. That includes washing and air drying before pressing on a shiny sock shaped hot press!

Although the company mainly design and produce socks for brands just recently they have set up a online shop at The Country Side store (link will be posted below). In the shop they have a selection of styles including their signature outdoor socks that I have been gifted to try.

I am super excited to try as not only are they locally produced. Compared to some socks I have purchased over the year they are very reasonabled priced.

My initial review they fit and feel very comfortable. I will be putting the them to some hike tests before I fully review but I do plan to purchase other styles.

I would like to thank Steve for inviting me along and giving a wee insite to how socks are made!

Thank you for reading Tracy x

https://caledoniahosiery.com/

https://www.thecountrysidestore.co.uk/seller/caledonia-hosiery/